brain butter III: the life of our food, etc.

 

PMA stands for Positive Mental Attitude. I think I learned this “term” from Bloomfield many years ago. It’s really only a reminder, we guess, for the chance we have at any time to have perspective, a golden frame of mind which sees things artistically rather than dreadedly. I don’t want to tell you what to do; but, keep in mind if you wish, you can see things as you see them – and this way of looking can always be uniquely yours. Perspective is your way of seeing the world and no one before you or after you has to see it the same way as you. No one way is any more valid than any other, to us anyway. Yet, yours is yours and this counts for a lot! 

[Keep in mind, I guess I’m only really writing to the breeze, and to our soon-to-be?!!! lil’ butter bean]

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Your mom seems to be a glowing artist in the kitchen. Just want to throw this out here. She does not simply read recipes and copy them – which anyone can do well. She experiments, she builds new things with her hands, she cooks using different ingredients we think are better than what’s called for; she cooks for all of us the way a “good” painter paints, from somewhere deeper and fuller than those who simply work for money. Your mom seems to me to be someone we can trust the way a gorgeous, proud, shady tree on a hillside can be trusted; also the way a candle in the dark can be trusted; also I could ramble on forever in the most interesting ways about your mom. She’s pretty much my favorite.

We’re eating a carrot or carrots most day – raw – for what we understand to be a kind of cleaner-upper of the stomach bacteria that could contribute to endotoxic load and estrogenic effects. I just noticed today many of the things we eat mucho like chocolate, red meat, even dried fruit mangoes, have high iron levels which apparently can lead to dirty brain conditions and heart disease, among other nasty effects. So I am experimenting with cilantro which I guess is an iron-chelator, in addition to the effects of drinking coffee, anyway, a few times a day (and when eating meat), because coffee can significantly reduce the absorption of iron as I understand it. Additionally, because chelators can also leach-out-into-poop copper, including tasty foods like shrimp and oysters, and other shellfish, seems to be a standard, easy consideration.

 

Take Me Down To The Carrot Eyes City by Dan M Cakes

 

[But, more investigation of iron – more or less? – is warranted, as is an investigative, on-going-experimental regard to all things of our living; so there’ll always be more to come, it seems, and a changing of opinions, we’re sure, and such appears to be the adventure!]

 

Even more, we’re looking at food labels with critical eyes; and if a food does not contain a food label (i.e. fresh, organic fruit or herbs from our garden), even better!

In the habit forming period of waking up and moving easily outside, to greet the sun and the sun greet us. A seemingly quick, powerful, and positive way to turn the stress of fasting and darkness immediately down, and feel stimulated for a fresh day of creativity and interaction. I’m out here now writing this, a natural vitamin D morning with coffee and milk, gelatin, fruit, fingers, and nature noising about like a song.

There will be so much in life you’ll learn, I suppose, just by being out in the world and living. Basically a clean slate, you’ll learn everything it seems, through trial and error, a process of experimenting, playing, and noticing how things are going. Your mother and I hope we never lose this mentality of exploration; no doubt we’ll see it in you early and be reminded often of a natural learning at its purest. You will, I would bet, teach us more about life, outside our own experience(s), than anything or anybody other.

I wonder how big you are now? And what you are up to each day? And do you hear your mom and I talking to you and to each other, reading aloud? Are you listening to the same birds and lawnmower sounds that we are as we walk the block?

I had this vision the other day, about sustainability in food, or at least the idea of sustainability in food. I’m thinking about “biodynamic” farming or people who do this in their own yards, growing their own food, “printing their own money”, living not dependent on grocery stores and boxed manufactoreds.

My idea goes something like this: although we’re not sustainable in the sense that we buy organic, [mostly whole] food at our local coop, and we eat out from time to time (consciously), and although we order gelatin from Great Lakes online and supplement with vitamins and various amino acids, etc., what if  we prepared and enjoyed our foods as if we are at our farm in everywhere, taking right from the land and doing what we’d do in near-nature… when drinking Strauss milk, what if I imagined the milking of a happy cow straight into a cold glass – and just enough so that I balance the work of it with what will nourish me in drinking?? What if when having a handful of berries, it’s as if I was out picking them one by one, and now can enjoy the fruits of my short labor???

If nothing else, I’m imagining, this would allow us to slow down, enjoy the eating process thoughtfully, and be engaged with our food(s) in compassionate ways. A way of reverentiality in fooding, perhaps – taking the time to be a part of the life that went into this life-sustaining act. A way of acting grateful for went into this experience. A way of celebrating, sharing, etc.

That even if we’re not directly out in the garden picking and playing with tools for our food, we can still remember this part of the process in our nourishment. At the least, this seems to us an applicable method of training the habit of non-excess, and of not being wasteful when eating. An increasing of mindfulness through our daily actions, I wonder, can not hurt.